BlogTalkRadio Summary July 12, 2010: Q&A on Mortgage Issues in DFA (Dodd-Frank Act)

2017-12-20T17:34:16+00:00 July 14th, 2010|Categories: BlogTalkRadio Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Glen Corso, Executive Director of  The Community Mortgage Banking Project, joined the BlogTalkRadio/Lykken on Lending show again today and was kind enough to answer a series of questions from the hosts about the content of the Dodd-Frank Act (DFA).  Glen has lobbied on behalf of the industry as this bill progressed through the legislative process.  The DFA is expected to pass the Senate soon and will then be signed by the President.  It has several provisions which, when implemented, will have a significant impact on the mortgage industry.  Its implementation is many months down the road, but its content needs to be understood to the extent possible.  Many of the provisions in the DFA will not be fully understood until regulators have finalized the Bill’s implementation rules. Click on the attachment to read through an extensive Q & A on these topics. Click PLAY to listen to the podcast of this week’s BlogTalkRadio/Lykken on Lending with Dave Lykken and MBSQuoteline’s Joe Farr: Listen to internet radio with David Lykken on Blog Talk Radio MBSQuoteline supplies the essential market information necessary for effective decision making by Originators when assisting borrowers during the loan origination process, and for secondary marketing departments while managing pipelines. For additional [...]

BlogTalkRadio Podcast, June 28, 2010

2017-12-20T17:34:16+00:00 June 30th, 2010|Categories: BlogTalkRadio Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Mortgage companies and mortgage originators will be significantly affected by what Congress does in the final Financial Reform bill.  The bill made it through the House and Senate Conference Committee last Friday.   Glen Corso, Executive Director of the Community Mortgage Banking Project, returned to the show today to describe what the bill now looks like.  He focused on the two provision directly affecting the mortgage industry: Risk Retention and Loan Officer Compensation. The current Risk Retention provision actually improved in the conference committee.  There is still a requirement for originators to retain 5% of the risk on the loans they originate and sell.  This would be devastating for the industry, except for the fact they the bill exempts almost all of the loans being made today.  The bill says that the requirement to retain risk does not apply to government guaranteed loans (FHA, VA, and USDA) and all other loans “well underwritten.  Well underwritten loans are loans that are fully documented and have reasonable ratios, are not negative amortization loans or loans with large payment adjustments possible.  Most Fannie and Freddie qualifying loans would meet this definition.  Glen believes the bill will allow an allocation of the retained risk between [...]

In The News: “Skin in the Game” – Risk Retention Amendment to Senate Bill 3217

2017-12-20T17:34:18+00:00 May 21st, 2010|Categories: In The News|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Senate Bill 3217 Restoring American Financial Stability is working its way through the Senate and is expected to be passed in the coming weeks.  Certain provisions of this bill will have a significant impact on the mortgage industry. As you may recall, the Senate Bill 3217, as originally proposed, included a provision which would have required 5% of the risk on all loans originated be retained by the originator upon sale to investors.  The provision was not clear as to which entity or entities in the origination chain would be required to retain the risk.  It was not clear whether the risk that was to be retained would be an ownership interest in the loan or reserves supported by cash.   It was also not clear how long the originator would have been required to retain the risk.  The original provisions would have been devastating to the mortgage industry.  The 5% risk retention would have forced many mortgage originators from the business and would have driven mortgage rates much higher.  After significant industry efforts, this provision was amended last week. The amendment, as passed by the Senate, does very little to answer these questions, but what it does do is exempt [...]

BlogTalkRadio Podcast – May 17, 2010

2017-12-20T17:34:18+00:00 May 20th, 2010|Categories: BlogTalkRadio Podcasts|Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , |

Senate Bill 3217 Restoring American Financial Stability was the focus of discussion on the show Monday, particularly two recently passed amendments which are of great interest to the mortgage banking industry.  The amendments deal with risk retention and loan officer compensation.  One is good for the industry and the other is not.  Glen Corso, Executive Director of The Community Mortgage Banking Project, joined the show to bring a first hand understanding of the amendments and their status. The amendment that is good for the mortgage industry deals with the risk retention provisions of the original  bill.  The original bill would have required mortgage originators to retain “skin in the game.  It would have required originators to retain 5% of the risk on all the loans they originated and sold to investors.  The amendment exempts from the 5% risk retention requirement certain mortgage loans which meet the definition of Qualified Mortgage Loans.  Since 90% or more of today’s loans will meet the definition of Qualified Mortgage Loan, the amendment significantly reduces the number of loans on which originators will be required to retain risk. The amendment that is not good for the mortgage industry restricts how loan originators are to be [...]